123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

News

Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge project features at two international water conferences

Poppy Dickinson

Consultants and beneficiaries of the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project (KMARP) recently presented at two international conferences in South Korea and the Philippines. They highlighted how the project, funded by the Asian Development Bank and managed by Landell Mills, is addressing declining groundwater levels in Kabul.

45th International Association of Hydrogeologists Congress, South KoreaSeptember 2018

HUGH KLEIN PRESENTING AT THE 45TH INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIST CONGRESS, SOUTH KOREA

HUGH KLEIN PRESENTING AT THE 45TH INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIST CONGRESS, SOUTH KOREA

Two of Landell Mills’ consultants presented at the congress which was made up of nine technical sessions related to the theme: Groundwater and Life: Science and Technology into Action. Additionally, the project funded four Afghan Government officials to attend and learn about groundwater management topics.

Hugh Klein’s presentation – Managed Aquifer Recharge and Aquifer Storage and Recovery in Kabul, Afghanistan – gave an overview of the declining groundwater levels in Kabul and how the project will pilot Managed Aquifer Recharge technology to address the issues. Managed Aquifer Recharge is the intentional recharge of water to aquifers (underground layers of water-bearing permeable rock) under controlled conditions.

ATTENDEES AT THE 45TH INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIST CONGRESS, SOUTH KOREA

ATTENDEES AT THE 45TH INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIST CONGRESS, SOUTH KOREA

Boris Matti’s presentation – Evaluating Managed Aquifer Recharge and Aquifer Storage and Recovery in Kabul, Afghanistan, Using Regional and Site-Specific Models – gave an introduction to the three-dimensional hydrogeological modelling of both the whole of Kabul basin and the project Managed Aquifer Recharge sites.

With the participation of groundwater scientists, engineers, academics, policy makers, and industry members, the congress is one of the largest and most important conferences for groundwater specialists.

Asia Water Forum 2018, Philippines October 2018

One of KMARP’s government beneficiaries, Engineer Anayatullah Popalzai, a Hydrogeologist from the Ministry of Energy and Water in Afghanistan, received funding from the project to present at the Asia Water Forum. He also learnt about relevant water management topics and Asian Development Bank’s (ADB) interventions.

image 3.jpg

Anayatullah Popalzai’s presentation – Managed Aquifer Recharge and Aquifer Storage and Recovery in Kabul, Afghanistan – discussed the problems surrounding groundwater availability in Kabul and how ADB funding is helping the government address the issues through pilot Managed Aquifer Recharge technology.

The Asia Water Forum 2018 was held at the Asian Development Bank Headquarters in Manila and focussed on the theme of Information, Innovation, and Technology. It provided a platform for sharing knowledge and experience on water information, innovation, and technology. 800 delegates attended the event, including government, donor, multi-national bank, NGO and private sector participants.

Landell Mills and Schlumberger train project and government staff in groundwater management in Afghanistan

Poppy Dickinson

Landell Mills organised a recent training and water features tour in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. The team from the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project and 15 government staff from the Afghanistan Ministry of Energy and Water and other government agencies attended. The training enhanced participants’ knowledge of groundwater as an important part of water supply.

group.jpg

The training was delivered from 22nd to 31st July by three members of staff from Schlumberger who are specialists in delivering world-leading technology in water services. Participants learned about groundwater studies, surveys and management. In addition, the firm shared its expertise in using groundwater telemetry equipment which measures water levels by collecting data that can then be visualised on a computer.

Group 1.jpg
IMG_1696.JPG

The water features tour took participants to the Nurek hydro power plant dam, which is the second tallest dam in the world, and included studies of hydrogeology, field exercises, software analysis and equipment configuration.

The project team and government staff will apply the knowledge and resources from the training to the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project which is investigating various methods to improve groundwater levels and quality in Kabul, one of the most water-stressed cities in the world.

Drilling begins for the new monitoring network to analyse groundwater levels in Kabul

Poppy Dickinson

3LMO_XUA.jpeg

As part of the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project (KMARP) funded by the Asian Development Bank, Landell Mills has commenced the drilling of a new monitoring network across the city. The drilling of 20 piezometer wells, which will monitor the groundwater levels, commenced on 6th July and is expected to be completed within four months.

Landell Mills’ consultants are supervising the drilling contractors, Diamond Geo Engineering, and overseeing the installation of monitoring equipment in the wells. It is expected that a further 20 wells will be drilled in the near future. 

Kabul is reliant on groundwater, but it is one of the most water-stressed cities in the world and its residents suffer from a lack of accessible drinking water. Due to issues such as contamination from pit latrines and waste disposal, as well as continued population growth, groundwater levels are stressed and of poor quality.

sRIDPFTA.jpeg

KMARP is investigating the use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques in order to improve groundwater levels and quality, as well as access to drinking water for Kabul. Managed Aquifer Recharge is the intentional recharge of water to aquifers (underground layers of water-bearing permeable rock) under controlled conditions. Some of the MAR techniques used on the project include a spreading basin and injection wells. The former involves a flat enclosed basin located on a permeable surface overlying an aquifer, then recharge water is placed in the basin area and allowed to infiltrate. Injection wells consist of a tube well that goes deep into the ground and water is pumped down into the aquifer below. 

The monitoring network will capture the changes in water level in great detail and analyse how MAR sites alter groundwater levels. The results of the project will be used to evaluate the feasibility of MAR in the city.

World Water Day Conference casts a spotlight on the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project

Poppy Dickinson

IN KABUL THE URBAN POOR RELY ON HAND PUMPS WHERE GROUNDWATER LEVELS ARE RAPIDLY DROPPING

IN KABUL THE URBAN POOR RELY ON HAND PUMPS WHERE GROUNDWATER LEVELS ARE RAPIDLY DROPPING

Landell Mills recently delivered a presentation on ‘Urban Water Management in the Hindu-Kush Himalaya Region’ focusing on two Landell Mills-managed projects in Afghanistan and Nepal. The presentation was given as part of the ‘Integrated Urban Water Management’ national meeting which was organised by the Irrigation and Water Forum and British Hydrological Society.

The meeting on 10th November, at The Institution of Civil Engineers in London, addressed the need to change management practices in order to help reverse degradation to water and other natural resources caused by urbanisation. Landell Mills joined several organisations who gave presentations at the event, ranging from universities, to the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, and the engineering firm, AECOM.

29541409_1616562845127756_1395569376953739672_n.jpg

Landell Mills’ Senior Water Specialist, Pete Harrison, shared challenges and lessons learned from the Kabul Managed Aquifer Recharge Project and the Bagmati River Basin Improvement Project. Pete recommended that future challenges, such as rapid urbanisation, climate change and lack of capital investment, require better water resources planning and enforcement, cost recovery and community engagement.

For more information contact Pete Harrison at PeteH@landell-mills.com